Issue #20 - 2011-12-12 - Beginner and Advanced Perl Maven video courses

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Hi,

Two weeks ago I published the Beginner Perl Maven online video course. This week it was followed by the Advanced course and an a discount for a few days. See details below.

In other news, Best Practical, the company of Jesse Vincent, is looking for a Perl Hacker. See further in this issue.

And now to the links on by one...


Headlines

Advanced Perl Maven online video course

When I announced the course I offered a 81% discount for 3 days. I'd like to offer this discount to you, the reader of the Perl Weekly as well: Until the 15th December 2011 you'll be able to buy the advanced course for $9 instead of $49 using the 'advanced_intro_9' coupon. The two parts of the Beginner course also have discount codes: 'beginner_15' and 'beginner2_15' respectively for $15 instead of $39 each.

The Triumphant Return of Zoidberg -- A Modular Perl Shell

Joel Berger announces a new version of the Perl shell. Cleaned and washed and ready to party.

Perl Rocks Latin America

Mark Keating (MDK) writes about the W3C competition and about the only Perl team that participated. And won. Leaving 46 other teams wishing they had better tools.


Articles

use B::Stats to check for less bloat

Reini Urban gives us a couple of examples where little, innocent looking modules eat up a lot of memory. He also points to tools to check memory footprint. Memory optimization might be an important field we have been neglecting in the Perl/CPAN community. Or maybe it's just me.

Create your own dualvars

In Perl, every scalar variable has both a string value and a numerical value. Usually they are related. brian d foy shows how to create such variables using Scalar::Util.

rjbs versus Encode

It's always fascinating to see a fight between man and machine. This time it is Ricardo Signes (RJBS) who had to deal with Encode, folding and Tibetian e-mail messages.

Track App Progress with Writable $0

chromatic explains how to change the name of your process as seen by 'ps' or 'top' on Linux.

How to parse HTML, part 2

If you have been following the posts of Jeffrey Kegler - and I saw many people clicked on those links - then you might be interested in the second part of this article.


Discussion

The Ten Minute Thinking Rule

I love the way Chisel explains how to get people to start thinking about a problem they face. It isn't always possible but I think it can work very well. Much better than saying RTFM or by giving them the solution.


Code

Announcing MooseX::Types::NumUnit for scientific simulations

Joel Berger is doing scientific simulations so he needed complex types that understand things like ft/s (or m/s for those in the metric system).

Using system or exec safely on Windows

Graham Knop, who almost never uses Perl on Windows, invested his time creating a way to escape all the characters that need to be escaped on Windows. This sounds a lot simpler than it is. I wish someone packaged this solution and put it on CPAN.


Other

YAPC::NA has a suggestion box that you can vote on

Usually I don't link to the small blog entries regarding next years YAPC::NA but this one I liked very much. 'Mob Rater' lets you suggest ideas for YAPC::NA and vote on the other ideas already listed. I think this is a nice idea and the results could be used by any YAPC or Perl workshop. So go ahead, put in your suggestions and vote on the other ones.

(vi) stackoverflow perl report

This weeks 'top 10 Perl on Stack Overflow' got some very interesting links. Thanks to Miguel Prz (niceperl) for collecting them week after week.

Best Practical is looking for a Perl Hacker

This is the company of Jesse Vincent, the former Perl 5 Pumpkin


Events

Saint Perl 2011 Conference

December 18, 2011, Saint-Petersburg, Russia

The Perl Oasis

January 13-15, 2012, Orlando, Florida, USA

Perl Workshop in Israel

February 28, 2012, Ramat Gan, Israel

German Perl workshop

March 5-7, 2012, Erlangen, Germany

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