Issue #33 - 2012-03-12 - The People Behind Debian

latest | archive | by Gabor Szabo

Hi,

I made some little progress with the back-end for the Perl Weekly but it is still mostly a manual process collecting news from various feeds.

If you are following the Perl Weekly on Twitter, Facebook or Google+ and notice I missed something that you think is important, don't hesitate to let me know. There are good chances that I just overlooked something.

Enjoy!


Announcements

Call for Venue for YAPC::Europe::2013

While the organizers are gearing up for YAPC::Europe::2012 in Frankfurt, the YAPC::Europe::Foundation has put out the call for the next venue. I guess if you work in a company that wants to hire many Perl developers then maybe encouraging the local Perl community to organize a YAPC in your city could be a good idea.

Send-A-Newbie 2012

Mark Keating announces the new round of the SAN initiative to bring people new to YAPC to their first conference.


Articles

Making the parsing game safe

In this post Jeffrey Kegler talks about problems where parsing has been avoided. As I understand that mostly means areas where we try to use regular expressions to extract information. We might call it parsing but we won't use the words 'grammar' or 'language' when describing the thing that needs to be parsed.

Mojolicious + Twitter's Bootstrap = Awesome

Joel Berger was playing around with some new toys and built a quick web site using mostly Mojolicious/Perl and relying on Bootstrap to build page elements.

address-sanitizer round 2

I am always amazed by the low level stuff Reini Urban does on Perl and while I know there are several people in the Perl 5 Porters who do that too, I am especially grateful that he is posting about it. In the long run that can help bring more people to contribute to core perl.

Loaded for Werewolf

I never checked where does the idea of 'silver bullet' comes from, but chromatic tells us it was used to hunt Werewolves. He then goes on explaining how using Moose can bring you an order of magnitude improvement in productivity. Or with other words how Moose is like a silver bullet. I am not big on zoology but I wonder if that means that a Moose can kill a werewolf?


People

People Behind Debian: Gregor Herrmann, member of the Perl team

Have you ever wondered who are the nice people that make sure Debian has tons of CPAN modules? We call them 'downstream' but they are actual people with faces and stories! It was very interesting to read this interview by Raphael Hertzog.


Testing

CPAN Testers Summary - February 2012 - Highway 61 Revisited

I think the CPAN Testers is a very important part of keeping and improving the quality of CPAN modules but I hardly have time to follow the mailing list. These regular reports help me keep informed. There is also going to be the annual Perl QA hackathon at the end of the months. If your company uses Perl and cares for quality then this would be a good opportunity to sponsor the event.


Code

asynchronicity

Tim Heaney (oylenshpeegul) implements asynchronous fetching of several web pages in 3 ways: Any::Event, Mojo::IOLoop and HTTP::Async. You can compare the code and the speed of each one of the solutions.

New 1.35 release of Perl DBD::ODBC

Martin Evans details the long list of changes that went into this release.

The Rise and Fall of Event Loops (in one very small place of my code)

fREW Schmidt describes his adventure into using POE for event loops just to find out that in his use case he does not really need those event loops. It is nice to see the code snippets for both his original attempt and the solution he ended up using.

Capture STDOUT and STDERR of external command

Sebastian Willing is showing his solution capturing standard error and the external command's exit code but ignoring standard output. You should also check the comment David Golden made as that might be a better solution for you.


Debugging

Easy Data::Printer in the perl debugger

If you are using the built-in debugger of perl (-d) then this snippet written by Chisel can help you get nicer - more colorful - output for the x command dumping complex data structure.


Perl 6

Macros progress report: D1 merged

Carl Masak reports about his progress in his grant for adding macros to Rakudo Perl 6

Meta-programming slides, and some Rakudo news

As usual Jonathan Worthington provides an excellent snapshot of what's going on in the development of Perl 6. While I have not been able to follow the development recently I wish I had some time to do that. What he write seems to be very exciting.


Other

StackOverflow Perl report

Just a reminder to check out the ten most rated Perl questions at Stack Overflow as collected by Miguel Prz

Being Helpful

Dave Cross complains (?) about some people who did not like his recommendation to improve their Perl code. It is sad to see how some of the response got aggressive but I also often fall in the same trap as Dave fell: People, if they are not asking for help, will probably dislike the volunteer help we give. If we would like to improve their code we have to wait till they think they would like to improve. Without that it usually does not work.


Training

Test Automation Workshop

I am going to give a 2-days long training class just before YAPC::NA.


The self promotion section

How to build a dynamic web application using PSGI

This is already the second part of a series of articles introducing Plack/PSGI. The first one is linked from this article. They start off at the basics and we'll see what is interesting for people so I know what to write about.

Extracting data from a file with multi-line records

I was just asked by someone to help with processing a log file. In this article I show 2 solutions. One with a flag the other one with the flip-flop operator of Perl.


Events

DC-Baltimore Perl workshop

April 14, 2012, Catonsville, MD, USA

Dutch Perl Workshop

April 14, 2012, The Hague, The Netherlands

YAPC::NA

June 13-15, 2012, Madison, Wisconsin, USA

YAPC::EU 2012

August 20-22, 2012, Frankfurt, Germany

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